Cockle was rescued on 4th March 2022
Cockle, a 4-6 months old male grey seal pup, was rescued from Coverack beach on 4th March 2022 by Grace a member of the animal care team.

This pup was very lethargic with an unusual breathing pattern and had an old infected wound on his rear right flipper. Also suffering from a worm burden infection with bad diarrhea.
Cockle - photo taken on 5th March 2022
Cockle - photo taken on 5th March 2022 When a pup first arrives in the hospital part of the clinical assessment is to check to see if there are any potential eye damage hence the yellow dye.

Click here to see a larger version of this and above photos of Cockle were taken on 5th March 2022.

Update - 20th March 2022 : Cockle was administered with the medicine needed by the vets to get him back on track and is currently in the hospital being cared for by the team.
Update - 3rd April 2022 : Cockle has completed his rehabilitation and is now ready to be returned to the wild in the next few weeks.

His flipper tag ID number is SL141 (white).

Click here to see a larger version of this photo and a further one of Cockle taken on 1st April 2022.
Cockle - photo taken on 1st April 2022
Seal Release Update - 14th April 2022 : Cockle along with Clam, Iceberg, Moon Jellyfish, Shrimp and Wobbegong were released back into the wild on 13th April 2022 at Porthtowan beach.

Click here to watch a short video.
Update - 22nd April 2022 : Cockle was seen at a haul out site on 18th April 2022 along the coast of Cornwall by members of the Seal Research Trust (SRT).

Photo Credit: Sue Sayer - SRT - 18th April 2022
Cockle
Members of the SRT volunteer hundreds of hours of their own time to photo, identify, carry out surveys, monitor and watch over the seals around the South West coasts.

Each seal´s fur pattern is unique and enables the Seal Research Trust volunteers to track them for life. Seals face many challenges, yet we all depend on them to balance our marine ecosystem, this is essential to make the oxygen we breathe. Seals are our globally rare wildlife tourist attraction, helping diversify coastal economic prosperity.


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