Charles was rescued on 23rd November 2017
Charles, 3 weeks old male seal pup, was rescued on 23rd November 2017 from Mawnan Smith.

The pup arrived weighing 13.5kg, very skinny with a small wound on his left shoulder.

Update - 7th December 2017 : Charles has been moved down to the outside nursery pools and learning how to compete for fish and gaining weight.
Charles
Charles Update - 1st January 2018 : Charles is currently in the convalescent pool for his final stage of rehabilitation.

Charles´s flipper ID tag number is 333 (green).

Click here to see a larger version of this photo was taken on 30th December 2017.
Update - 25th February 2018 : Charles is still in the convalescent and will be released back to the wild soon.

Click here to see a larger version of this photo was taken on 23rd February 2018.
Charles
Charles in the hospital on 25th March 2018 Update - 29th March 2018 : Charles has been moved back into the hospital as he recently has had a poorly stomach in the nursery pools and the team want to keep an closer eye on him. Hopefully Charles will feel better soon and able to re-join his friends in the outside pools.

He currently weighs 18kgs.

Click here to see a larger version of this photo was taken on 25th March 2018.
Update - 29th April 2018 : Charles is now back down in the outside convalescent pool, he currently weighs 23.5kgs.

Click here to see a larger version of this photo was taken on 27th April 2018.
Charles in the convalescent pool on 27th April 2018
Seal Release 25th May 2018 Update - 29th May 2018 : Charles along with Damzel, Legolas, Marigold and Maude, were released back into the wild on 25th May 2018 at Dollar Cove.

Click here to see a selection of photos.
Update: 4th August 2021 - Charles was spotted at haul-out along the coast of Cornwall on 9th March 2020, 15th July 2021 and 4th August 2021 by members* of the Cornwall Seal Group Research Trust.

*Members of the CSGRT volunteer hundreds of hours of their own time to photo, identify, carry out surveys, monitor and watch over the seals around the Cornish coast.

Each seal´s fur pattern is unique and enables the CSGRT volunteers track them for life. Seals face many challenges, yet we all depend on them to balance our marine ecosystem, this is essential to make the oxygen we breathe. Seals are our globally rare wildlife tourist attraction, helping diversify coastal economic prosperity.

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